Types of Emergency Lighting

Types of Emergency Lighting

RES can provide a wide range of Emergency Lights for your business premises. Emergency escape lighting is defined as “that part of emergency lighting that is provided to enable safe exit in the event of failure of the normal supply”.

As well as highlighting fire exits, emergency lighting provides essential illumination throughout escape routes including steps, stairways, changes in direction and fire and first aid points.

The design and placement of Emergency Lighting is subject to BS EN 1838:2013 which specifies escape and standby lighting requirements for businesses in the event of a power failure.

What is maintained and non-maintained emergency lighting?

A maintained emergency light is always on and will stay illuminated in the event of a power failure. These lights are usually installed in communal areas such as corridors and stair wells.

A non-maintained emergency light only comes on in the event of a power failure. These lights will usually be installed in areas that don’t need a permanent light source.

Typical Products Used

LED Bulkhead Emergency Light

Designed to provide emergency lighting and illuminate escape routes during a power cut

  • – LED Light Source
  • – 3 Hour Emergency Duration
  • – Suitable for ceiling and wall mounting
  • – Maintained or Non-Maintained

Wall/Ceiling Mounted LED Emergency Exit Sign

Designed for ceiling/wall mounting along corridors that form part of the escape route

  • – LED Light Source or 8-Watt Fluorescent Tube
  • – 3 Hour Emergency Duration
  • – Suitable for ceiling and wall mounting
  • – Maintained or Non-Maintained

Round Bulkhead Light

Designed to provide emergency lighting and illuminate escape routes during a power cut

  • – LED Light Source
  • – 3 Hour Emergency Duration
  • – Suitable for ceiling and wall mounting
  • – Maintained or Non-Maintained

LED Twin Spot Emergency Light

Designed for large or high areas such as escape routes, sports stadiums, high bay warehouse, car workshops, racked areas and railway stations

  • – LED Light Source
  • – 3 Hour Emergency Duration
  • – Suitable for wall mounting
  • – Non-Maintained

Emergency Downlights

Emergency downlights are designed to be small and unobtrusive yet highly effective in the event of a loss of mains power.

  • – LED Light Source
  • – 3 Hour Emergency Duration
  • – Discreet ceiling mounting
  • – Maintained or non-maintained
Speak to RES about your Emergency Lighting requirements
    • – Emergency Lighting Installation & Commissioning
    • – Emergency Lighting Inspection and Testing
    • – Emergency Lighting Fault Finding and Repairs
    • – Emergency Lighting Regular Checks

Why use Lith-Ex Fire Extinguishers?

Why use Lith-Ex Fire Extinguishers?

Lith-Ex extinguishers have been specifically designed to tackle Lithium-Ion battery fires. These batteries can be found in electronic devices such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops, but also vaping machines, power tools, toys, electric scooters, e bikes and also cars.
Lithium-Ion battery fires can occur when there is thermal runaway which produces enough heat to eventually produce fire. This can occur as a result of electrical shorting, rapid discharge, overcharging, manufacturer defects, poor design or mechanical damage.
The storage of Lithium-Ion batteries in high volumes needs to be carefully managed through suppression, cooling, isolation, and containment. Whether you are storing them for goods distribution, battery collection bins, battery recycling, public services, battery charging stations etc.
Lithium-Ion battery fires are difficult to tackle as the design of the cells often prevent direct access of the extinguishing agent to the source of the fire.
Lith-Ex extinguishers contain Aqueous Vermiculite Dispersion (AVD), a revolutionary fire extinguishing agent. The water content of the extinguisher cools the fire source, while the Vermiculite platelets encapsulate the fuel source creating a thermal barrier to prevent propagation of the fire. The Vermiculite film is not electrically conductive. AVD is nearly twice as effective as water on a Class A fires and is environmentally friendly.

The LITH-EX EXTINGUISHER


The world’s first Fire Extinguisher to tackle Lithium ion battery fires such as mobile phones, tablets, laptops, toys, power tools and electric scooters.
    • – Designed for use on lithium battery fires up to a battery power rating of 250 – 500Wh
    • – Compact
    • – Lightweight
    • – Easy to store
    • – Non-toxic
    • – Environmentally friendly
Available in 500ML, 1L, 2L, 6L, 9L, 25L or 50L sizes.
Recommended Accessories
We also recommend the use of Heavy Duty Lithium Battery Fire Blankets which Provides safe storage and protection in transit, Working temperature up to 1000°C , Fire resistant technical fabrics and industrial stitching.
Lithium Battery Fire Suppression Kit  for the Safe storage of extinguished devices. Reduces the risk of explosion after the fire has been extinguished. Withstands temperature in excess of 1000°C
Lithium Battery Fire Resistant Container. Safe storage and transit of Lithium-ion battery packs, fireworks, and flammable chemicals. Acts as a thermal shield to reduce the threat of ignition from thermal conductivity.  

Get in touch for more information

The Importance of Regular Fire Safety Inspections and Maintenance – October 2021

It is vitally important to regularly inspect and maintain your buildings fire safety equipment. As a business owner, you are responsible for the safety of your building, employees and visitors. This includes the provision of adequate fire safety equipment and systems throughout the building. With more and more businesses returning to the office, it is essential to check that your fire safety equipment is regularly inspected.

Fire Extinguishers­

Fire Extinguishers need to be inspected and maintained by a competent person once a year in accordance with BS 5306. During these thorough checks your extinguisher is serviced and any necessary repairs are carried out or a replacement is recommended. A basic service would include checking it is in date, hasn’t been tampered with, is in good working order, is the correct weight and pressure and has the correct signage and positioning.

BS5306 recommends that fire extinguishers are tested by discharge every five years (water foam and powder) and refilled or replaced, and every ten years (CO2).  CO2 bottles are hydraulically tested at the ten year point, or the extinguisher is replaced.


It is also a requirement to keep a record of all servicing, maintenance and inspections of fire extinguishers.


Outside of the annual inspections, the responsible person for the premises should ensure that a visual inspection is carried out on all fire extinguishers monthly as follows;

    • – Check that the extinguishers are in the correct location
    • – Check that the anti-tamper seals are not missing
    • – Check the pressure gauge is in the green section
    • – Check for any damage to the extinguishers
    • – Confirm the operating instructions are legible
    • – Ensure the extinguishers not obstructed and are visible

RES extinguisher engineers are BAFE accredited (BAFE BS 5306 Part 3- Portable Extinguisher Maintenance).

Fire Alarms

British Standard: BS 5839 recommends any installed fire alarm system in your premises be maintained by a competent person at least twice a year. This includes detectors, call points and panels. A competent person is someone who has sufficient technical knowledge, understands the different types of fire alarms and how they work, is familiar with the makes and models, and has a good understanding of the legal requirements including the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (RRO/FSO) and the BS 5839.

Routine fire alarm maintenance checks should be carried out by a competent person and include the following:

    • – Control panels
    • – Devices (sensors and detectors)
    • – Call points
    • – Voice alarms
    • – Batteries
    • – Reporting (Log book entry is a requirement)

RES provide fire alarm regular checks, servicing and maintenance. RES fire alarm engineers are BAFE accredited to BAFE SP203 – Fire Detection and Alarm System Modular Scheme SP203 – Part 1.

Emergency Lighting

Emergency Lighting is covered by BS EN 50172 / BS 5266-8 which provides guidance on the minimum level of testing dependant on the type of site you operate. Your responsible person should oversee the appropriate schedule.

Testing is as follows:


Monthly – Test all emergency lighting systems and ensure all luminaries and signs illuminate and are clean and present. A quick flick test is adequate.


Annually – To check that the lights remain illuminated for their full rated duration.


For safety reasons, the standards advise that the emergency lighting testing should be carried out at times of least risk to the buildings occupants or if possible, when the premises are unoccupied or in unoccupied portions of those premises.


RES provide Emergency Lighting Inspection and Testing, Fault Finding, Repairs and Regular Checks

RES fire alarm engineers are BAFE accredited to BAFE SP203 – Fire Detection and Alarm System Modular Scheme SP203 – Part 1.

Passive Fire Protection – Fire Doors

It is good practice to regularly inspect that your fire doors function correctly and that it will perform to its designed standard. Fire doors where traffic is high are more likely to be damaged and should be checked once a week/month (dependent on usage) by the responsible person for the property.


Periodic checks should be carried out every six months. Article 17 of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (RRO/FSO) makes it a legal requirement to ensure that fire resisting doors and escape doors are correctly installed and adequately maintained in order for them to be fit for purpose.


RES passive engineers are FIRAS Certified for Fire Door Maintenance.

Passive Fire Protection – Fire Stopping

According to FIRAS, fire protection measures can be degraded over time and it is the legal responsibility of the Responsible Person that the fire protection be adequately maintained. It is the responsibility of the responsible person to ensure that regular inspection takes place. Fire stopping is the compartmentation of a building bounded by fire resisting elements such as walls, floors and ceilings. Fire resisting elements are used around cables, pipes and ventilation systems.


We recommend your fire stopping is inspected every six months.


RES passive engineers are FIRAS Certified for Penetration Sealing (Fire Stopping).

Smoke Control / Automatic Opening Vents (AOVs)

Smoke vents have moving parts such as struts, hinges, pistons and actuators which remain stationary for long periods of time. As a result these systems can be prone to failure or fault. These systems should be regularly checked and subject to two maintenance visits per year to ensure they operate correctly.


RES undertake the servicing and maintenance of Smoke Control / Automatic Opening Vents (AOVs).

Dry Risers

BS 9990 requires that Dry Riser systems to undergo an annual static pressure test and inspection and a six monthly visual inspection, by a competent person. This ensures that the Dry riser system is maintained and functioning correctly for the fire brigade at all times.


RES can undertake dry riser servicing, testing and maintenance.

Fire Hydrants

BS 9990 requires that private fire hydrants to undergo an annual test and inspection and a six monthly inspection by a competent person to ensure the hydrant remains ready and in a working condition for brigade use. The Responsible Person should make periodical inspections of all Hydrants on a weekly and or a monthly basis.


Contact RES for ALL your Servicing, Testing and Maintenance needs.

This article is for general guidance only, please get in touch if you need assistance

What is a Fire Alarm Zone Plan? 

What is a Fire Alarm Zone Plan? 

A fire alarm zone plan is an illustrated layout of your building, listing all its fire alarm zones. It should show the building exits, stairs, corridors, lifts etc. The fire alarm zone plan should be located next to the fire alarm panel, which can immediately identify where any potential fire situation may have occurred. Do I need a zone plan?  Under BS5839-1:2017, it is essential for buildings to have fire alarm zone plans Your zone plan should show as a minimum all building entrances, circulation areas (corridors, stairs, lifts etc) and accurately indicate the orientation of the building. The division into zones and should also include a ‘You Are Here’ sign so you can locate where you are in the building. Did you know?  In at least one multiple-fatality fire, it has been determined that some or all the deaths could have been avoided if a diagrammatic representation of the premises (commonly described as a zone plan) had been provided in close proximity to the CIE (Control and indicating equipment). Accordingly, it is important to ensure that a suitable zone plan is provided adjacent to all CIE (including any repeat control and/or indicating equipment), unless the CIE incorporates a suitable display (e.g. an illuminated mimic diagram). The objective is to ensure that those responding to a fire alarm signal (including staff on the premises and firefighters) are given unambiguous information as to the location of a fire. RES can provide a Fire Alarm Zone plan for your premises, as well as Fire Evacuation and Procedure Plans, Fire Escape Plans, Fire Equipment Plans, Fire Compartmentation Plans, Occupancy Assessment Plans. These can be printed at A4 or A3 size and are typically mounted in specialist anti-glare snap frames.

Fire Door Safety Week 2021

Fire Door Safety Week  – 20-26 September 2021

Each year, the British Woodworking Federation run a campaign to raise awareness of the critical role that fire doors play in saving lives and protecting property. To support this, RES aim to share a number information on the subject via Twitter, Linked-in and Facebook during the week of 20th September 2021. RES provide a comprehensive Fire Door Installation and Fire Door Inspection and Maintenance service  to our customers. For more information on the campaign please visit https://www.firedoorsafetyweek.co.uk/ https://twitter.com/FDSafetyWeek And keep an eye out on the RES twitter feed

Fire Alarm systems for Domestic Premises – 4th August 2021

Fire Alarm systems for Domestic Premises

Domestic fire detection and alarm system standards are outlined in the BS 5839-6:2019, as amended 2020 Code of practice for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of fire detection and fire alarm systems for domestic properties. In this edition there have been some changes to the “Grades” of systems from the previous edition. The type of domestic premises covered by this British Standard are:

A) designed to accommodate a single family;

B) houses in multiple occupation comprising a number of self‑contained units, each designed to accommodate a single person or family;

C) sheltered housing, including both the dwelling units and the common areas;

D) supported housing.

The recommendations within the standard apply to both new and existing domestic premises with the types of domestic property’s covered include:

– Bungalows,

– Multi-storey houses,

– Individual flats,

– Individual maisonettes,

– Mobile homes,

– Individual sheltered accommodation as well as their common parts,

– Houses in multiple occupation (HMOs),

– Certain NHS housing in the community,

– Mansions,

– Shared houses,

– Houses divided into several self-contained single-family dwelling units.

It also applies to premises used for self-catering holidays if occupied by not more than ten persons, and premises with short-term paying guests in the home of a resident operator with not more than eight guests. It is limited to premises in which guest accommodation is not located below a ground floor or above a first floor, and in which no storey is greater than 200 m2 in area. For larger premises, the recommendations of BS 5839‑1 apply. This standard does not to the following property’s:

– Hostels,

– Caravans or boats (other than permanently moored boats used solely as residential premises),

– To the communal parts of blocks of flats or maisonettes.

It does not apply to any premises used for purposes other than as domestic premises (e.g. small shops, factories or similar premises used solely as places of work). This British Standard breaks the fire alarm and warning systems down into 8 “Grades”.
System grade relates to the engineering aspects of the fire detection and fire alarm system. Higher grades of system tend to provide a greater level of control and monitoring of the system, or greater reliability and availability to perform correctly in the event of fire. The grade of system that needs to be installed depends on the nature of the premises, the level of fire risk and the characteristics of the likely occupants.
Grade A
  • – This system is designed and installed in the main according to the recommendations of BS 5839‑1:2017, (Code of practice for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of fire detection and fire alarm systems for non domestic properties). The detectors, sounders and the central control and indicating equipment with a back-up power supply conform to British Standards BS EN 54-2 and BS EN 54‑4.

Grade B
  • – Not currently defined

Grade C
  • – A system of fire detectors and alarm sounders (which may be combined in the form of smoke alarms) connected to a common power supply, comprising the normal mains and a standby supply, with central control equipment.

Grade D1
  • – A system of one or more mains powered detectors, each with a tamper‑proof standby supply consisting of a battery or batteries

Grade D2
  • – A system of one or more mains-powered detectors, each with an integral standby supply consisting of a user‑replaceable battery or batteries.

Grade E
  • – Not currently defined

Grade F1
  • – A system of one or more battery-powered detectors powered by a tamper‑proof primary battery or batteries

Grade F2
  • – A system of one or more battery-powered detectors powered by a user‑replaceable primary battery or batteries.

In the case of Grade D and Grade F systems, where more than one smoke or heat alarm is installed, these normally need to be interlinked.

Levels of Protection/Categories of System

There are three categories for domestic fire detection and fire alarm systems these categories  outline where the detectors/sounders should be installed and level of protection given, the “LD” indicates that the fire detection and fire alarm system is intended for the protection of life. All domestic premises need to be provided with an appropriate fire detection and fire alarm system, for full coverage a Category LD1 is installed, such a system gives the earliest practicable warning of fire to occupants, wherever ignition occurs. However, a good level of protection can normally be obtained from a Category LD2 system, in which detection is only provided at points where the fire risk is high or where combustion products would present a significant hazard to life. A Category LD2 system might, for instance, have detectors only in the circulation areas of premises, the living room and the kitchen; other areas might be left without detector coverage. The areas protected by a Category LD2 system include escape routes, i.e. those areas that would be protected by a Category LD3 system. A Category LD3 system is intended only to protect circulation areas that would be used as escape routes.
Category LD1
  • – A system installed throughout the premises, incorporating detectors in all circulation areas that form part of the escape routes from the premises and in all rooms and areas other than those with negligible sources of ignition, such as toilets, bathrooms and shower rooms.
So detectors/sounders are typically installed in Hallways, Landings, Living Rooms, Kitchens, Bedrooms, Airing cupboards/Meter cupboards etc
Category LD2
  • – A system incorporating detectors in all circulation areas that form part of the escape routes from the premises and also in all specified rooms or areas that present a high fire risk to occupants, including any kitchen etc.
So detectors/sounders are typically installed in Hallways, Landings, Kitchens etc
Category LD3
  • – A system incorporating detectors in all circulation areas that form part of the escape routes from the premises.
So detectors/sounders are typically installed in Hallways, Landings etc
This article is intended as a summary guide and is not a substitute for the full Code of Practice of BS 5839 Part 6: 2019, A1:2020. More information can be accessed here: You can buy the full BS 5839-6 online from the BSI Shop Building Regulations are available for free from gov.uk

Components of a Fire Detection and Alarm System – 19th July 2021

Components of a Fire Detection and Alarm System

There are a variety of components that form a fire alarm system – the requirements of fire alarm system are subject to the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 and the design and installation of fire alarm systems is subject to British Standard BS 5839-1:2017.
Control Panels
Control panels continuously manage and monitor the fire alarm device circuits and provide power to these circuits. They provide indication of fire alerts, faults and location. Control panels enable the configuration, testing, disablement and triggering of fire alarm signals and devices. Control Panels are usually located in a low fire risk area such as an entrance / exit lobby and should be accompanied by a zone chart.
Smoke Detectors

Ionization Smoke Detectors

Ionization chamber smoke detectors detect smoke by the reduction it causes in the current that flows between electrodes in an ionization chamber within the detector.

Optical Smoke Detectors

Optical smoke detectors detect smoke by means of the light scatter that results from the presence of a small light source within the detector.

Optical Smoke Beam Detectors

Optical beam detectors operate by detecting the obscuration of the light source that occurs in the presence of smoke.

Combustion Gas Detectors
Combustion gas detectors are point-type detectors that respond to one (or more) of the gases produced by a fire. For example, carbon monoxide is produced when incomplete combustion occurs as a result of restriction of the amount of oxygen available to support the combustion process.
Flame Detectors
Flame detectors detect the infrared and/or ultraviolet radiation that is emitted by flame. Both types use radiation-sensitive cells that “see” the fire either directly or through built-in lenses or reflectors.
Heat Detectors
Heat detectors may take the form of either point type detectors or line type detectors. The detection system may be designed to respond when a fixed temperature is reached. The heat detector may also include a sensor that responds to the rate of rise of temperature. In this case, the detector responds when either the temperature rises at more than a certain rate, or when the fixed temperature is reached.
Multi Sensor Detectors
In a fire detection and alarm system incorporating multi-sensor detectors, each multi-sensor fire detector contains more than one sensor, each of which responds to a different physical and/or chemical characteristic of fire. For example, with a heat and optical multi-sensor detector the optical sensor might be disabled during the day. If this is the case, it is vital that the detectors are spaced for the least sensitive sensor, in this case, heat.
Manual Call Points
Manual call points or Break Glass call points are a key component of a fire detection and fire alarm system which is used for the manual initiation of an alarm. Manual call points should be sited where they can be easily seen next to premises exit doors but not where they are likely to be exposed to accidental damage. It is recommended that they should be fitted with protective covers to reduce the likelihood of a false activation.
Alarm Sounders
Fire alarm sounders are an audible fire alarm device such as a Bell, Dome Bell, Sirens Solid Sate Sounder and Horn and operate throughout the building to indicate the need for evacuation of the entire building. Traditionally, a sound pressure level of 65 dB(A) has been regarded as the minimum acceptable sound pressure level for fire alarm signals or 75 dB(A) in sleeping accommodation. Also the fire alarm sound level should be a further 10 dB(A) above any ambient noises that may be present in a premises. Power Supply The power supply for the fire detection and fire alarm system is normally derived from the low voltage mains supply in the building. The mains supply needs to be reliable and capable of supplying the largest load that can be placed on it under normal, fire and fault conditions. The mains supply needs to be backed up by a standby supply that is able to support the system while the fault in the mains supply is corrected.
Regular Testing
It is vital that a regular weekly and monthly test to be carried out to ensure that there has not been any major failure of the entire system, or a significant part of the system. For full guidelines please refer to BS 5839-1:2017 Fire detection and fire alarm systems for buildings. Code of practice for design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of systems in non-domestic premises
Weekly tests:
– A manual call point should be operated during working hours (as the purpose of the test is to familiarise and ensure the occupants of a premises can hear the alarm), at approximately the same time each week. – A different manual call point should be used each time. – Voice alarm systems should be tested in accordance with BS5839 Part 8Fire detection and fire alarm systems for buildings. Code of practice for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of voice alarm systems
Monthly tests:
– Any automatically started generator used for the fire detection and fire alarm system should be tested – Any vented batteries used as a standby power supply for the fire detection and fire alarm system inspected
Inspection and Servicing
Fire alarm systems need to be inspected and serviced every Six Months by a competent person. Due to the specialist nature of the work, fire alarm inspections are usually contracted out to a fire alarm service organization such as RES, whose competence can be assured via third-party certification and accreditation. RES are accredited to British Standard Institute BSI EN ISO 9000, are a BSI Kitemark Licenced Fire Alarm Installer, and have BAFE Accreditation for Fire Detection and Alarm System Modular Scheme SP203 – Part 1. RES are also members of The British Fire Consortium, Fire Industry Association, The Fire Protection Association.

Fire Detection and Alarm System Categories Explained – 16 July 2021

Fire Detection and Alarm System Categories Explained (non-domestic premises)

There are eight categories of Fire Detection and Alarm Systems as defined in the British Standard 5839 Part 1 Fire detection and fire alarm systems for buildings. Code of practice for design, installation, commissioning, and maintenance of systems in non-domestic premises. Each category falls under three different type of system.

M – Manual system, no automatic fire detectors so the building is fitted with call points and sounders

L – Automatic Systems intended for the protection of life.

P – Automatic Systems intended for the protection of property.

A fire risk assessment should be carried out to establish which alarm type and category is required for your premises.

Category M – Manual fire alarm system

Category L1 – Maximum life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L2 – Additional life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L3 – Standard life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L4 – Modest life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L5 – Localised life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category P1 – Maximum property protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category P2 – Minimum property protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category M – Manual fire alarm system


Category M fire alarm systems are common for places of work, such as offices, shops, factories, warehouses and restaurants. Fire alarm systems in this category are manual, where the alarm must be activated by a person using a Manual Call Point. Typical adoption of this category are offices, shops, factories, warehouses and restaurants. A Category M system normally satisfies the requirements of legislation. It is, however, often combined with a Category P system to satisfy the requirements of insurers, as company policy for protection of assets, or to protect against business interruption.

M Category Fire Alarm System

Category L1 – Maximum life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L1 fire detection and alarm systems provide the maximum level of life protection and are often provided in large or complex buildings such as stadiums, hospitals, care homes, shopping centres, large mixed use office blocks as well as sleeping accommodation such as hotels, hostels, student accommodation, houses under multiple occupation. Automatic fire detection is installed in all rooms and areas of the building including roof spaces and voids.

L1 Category Fire Alarm System

Category L2 – Additional life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L2 fire detection and alarm systems are designed to give an early warning of fire to occupants beyond the room in which the fire originates and provide early detection in areas of high risk. Example areas of high risk include boiler rooms, plant rooms, computer/server rooms and other areas with heavy plant machinery. Typical adoption of this category are factories and medium sized sleeping accommodation residential properties.

L2 Category Fire Alarm System

Category L3 – Standard life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L3 fire detection and alarm systems provide warning to occupants beyond the room in which the fire originates, enabling occupants to use the escape routes such as corridors and staircases before they become filled with smoke. Automatic fire detection should be installed on all escape routes and in all rooms that open onto an escape route. Typical adoption of this category are medium sized office blocks and commercial buildings with stairs.

L3 Category Fire Alarm System

Category L4 – Modest life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

Category L4 fire detection and alarm systems provide automatic fire detection within escape routes comprising circulation areas and spaces, such as corridors and stairways. An L4 system would not satisfy the requirements of legislation in buildings in which people sleep. Typical adoption of this category are commercial premises.

L4 Category Fire Alarm System

Category L5 – Localised life protection automated fire detection and alarm system

A category L5 fire detection and alarm system is designed specifically from the recommendations of a fire risk assessment. This custom category needs to be specified by a qualified fire engineer usually include automatic fire detection which is installed to meet the occupiers use of the premises.

L5 Category Fire Alarm System

Category P1 – Maximum property protection automated fire detection and alarm system A category P1 fire detection and alarm system protects buildings that are critical to the operation of a business. Maximum protection is provided to the whole site such as having automatic fire detection in all areas of the building, enabling the prompt detection and neutralisation of a potential fire as quickly as possible.

P1 Category Fire Alarm System

Category P2 – Minimum property protection automated fire detection and alarm system A category P2 fire detection and alarm system protects high risk areas of a building and provides early detection from the most likely sources of a fire and helps to minimize the damage to a property and business.

P2 Category Fire Alarm System

RES are accredited to British Standard Institute BSI EN ISO 9000, are a BSI Kitemark Licenced Fire Alarm Installer, and have BAFE Accreditation for Fire Detection and Alarm System Modular Scheme SP203 – Part 1. RES are also members of The British Fire Consortium, Fire Industry Association, The Fire Protection Association.

Types of Fire Detection and Alarm Systems – July 2021

Types of Fire Detection and Alarm Systems

There are generally four main types of Fire Detection and Alarm Systems commonly found in commercial properties
  • Conventional
  • Addressable
  • Wireless
  • Aspirating
Fire detection and alarm systems are a legal requirement under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order for non-domestic premises such as Offices, Shops, Hotels, Public Venues.
Conventional Fire Alarm Systems
Conventional fire detection and alarm systems can be found in smaller premises such as shops and restaurants and are comprised of dividing a building into a number of detection zones in a circuit that are linked to a control panel. If a detector is activated, the control panel will identify the circuit where the detector is located and therefore the zone from which the fire alarm has come. These systems tend to be less expensive to install than other types of fire detection and alarm systems.
Analogue Addressable Fire Detection and Alarm Systems
Addressable fire detection and alarm systems can be found in larger, more complex premises such as offices, schools, hospitals, hotels, manufacturing facilities. These systems are able to locate a specific detector in the event of an alarm which enables the emergency services to tackle the exact position of the potential fire. An addressable system reduces the risk of false alarms and can also be extended more easily.
Wireless Fire Detection and Alarm Systems
Wireless fire detection and alarm systems are suited to premises where it is impractical to run cables throughout a property such as listed buildings. Detectors and call points are connected using radio connectivity. These systems are typically more expensive to buy but are less expensive to install and upgrade than conventional and addressable systems.
Aspirating Smoke Detection and Alarm Systems
Aspirating Smoke Detection and Alarm Systems can typically be found in warehouses and unmanned data rooms. These systems use a fan to draw air from around a building using a network of sampling zones. Precision detectors constantly analyse the air and give warning when it detects smoke particles. These systems are typically more expensive to install due to the network of pipes and air filtration detection required.
RES provides a complete fire detection and fire alarm system design, installation and commissioning service, ensuring your premises are compliant to British Standards.